Cocos2D-Swift 3.0: A great way to get started developing iOS games!

If you’re new to iOS game development now is a great time to get started. In 2008 a brilliant engineer named Ricardo Quesada rewrote his 2D game engine for Apple’s iOS and released it as open source. It’s no exaggeration to say that hundreds of games, like my own, were developed using Cocos2D—including dozens of hits. Now it’s 2014 and the newbie game developer has several versions of Quesada’s Cocos2D framework to choose from. But for me the branch of Cocos2D devoted to the iPhone and iPad will always have a special place in my heart. Clearly Cocos2D-iPhone (now called Cocos2D-Swift) was the inspiration for Apple’s SpriteKit framework. And once you learn the fundamentals of Cocos2D on iOS you can easily transfer these skills to Android, Windows, and HTML5 versions of the Cocos2d family. Working with Cocos2d-Swift is like “reading Shakespeare in the original Klingon.”

Learning iPhone Game Development with Cocos2d 3.0 by Kirill Muzykov is a book I wish I had when I was learning to develop my first iPhone game. Muzykov patiently covers all the basics (nodes, sprites, actions, text, sound, buttons, menus) and jumps into advanced topics (particles, physics, tile maps, iTunesConnect, Game Center, and in-app purchases) while guiding the reader though creating a game called CocosHunt and using important tools (Particle Designer, Texture Packer, Tiled) and websites (freesound.org, media.io).

Along the way the reader also learns about Objective-C, Xcode, and iOS APIs. You’re still a beginner by the time you finish Muzykov’s book but you’re a well informed beginner and ready to tackle larger and more complex projects—like the next Candy Crush.

One of the best things I like about Muzykov’s book is it’s structure. A typical chapter starts with setting up a project and cycles through segments entitled “time for action” and “what just happened?”. This alternating rhythm becomes a reliable way to digest the material and ensure the author doesn’t wave his hands over new concepts. Almost every chapter includes a pop-quiz. I’m not a big fan of quizzes but if that’s what you need to re-enforce the material Muzykov provides them.

The source code is clean and clearly written with good comments. Muzykov keeps the syntax simple, using “typedef enum” instead of “typedef NS_ENUM” and “#define” instead of “FOUNDATION_EXPORT NSString *const” which is probably for portability. Much of a game is managing state and game developer who follow Muzykov examples in his classes won’t get into trouble.

If you’re new to mobile game development and you want to focus on iOS then Learning iPhone Game Development with Cocos2d 3.0 is a good book for you.