Binge Watching Handmade Hero

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For the last several weeks I’ve been obsessed with one TV show. It’s changed my viewing habits, my buying habits, and my computing habits. Technically it’s not even a “TV show” (if your definition of that term doesn’t include content created by non-professionals that is only available for free over the Internet).

But for me, a more or less typical Gen-Xer, Handmade Hero by game tool developer Casey Muratori has me totally enthralled as only must see TV can enthrall. I’m hooked and I simply must watch all 256+ episodes of Handmade Hero before I die (in about 1,406 Saturdays according to the How Many Saturdays app).

So first off let me explain a few things. Unless you are an aspiring retro game programmer or aging C/C++ programmer Handmade Hero will seem tedious at best and irrelevant at worst. There are much better and more modern ways to make a video game (like SpriteKit on iOS or Unity on any OS) but Casey promises to demonstrate live on Twitch.TV how to write a complete video game from scratch, without modern frameworks, that will run on almost anything with a CPU. He’s starting with Windows but promises Mac OS X, Linux, and Raspberry Pi.

This is a bold promise! When I first heard of Handmade hero, almost 2 years ago I ignored it. I didn’t know who Casey Muratori was and the Internet is littered with hundreds of these solo projects that tend to fissile out like ignobly failed Kickstarter projects.

But a comment in Hacker News caught my eye about a month ago. Casey had delivered hundreds of hours of live coding with explanations of arcane C, Windows, and video programming techniques! It’s all archived on YouTube and he’s still steaming almost every night! Awesomesause!

So I had to check it out. I started with Casey’s first video, Intro to C on Windows, and ate it up. I had to pound through the rest of that week’s archive. Because I have a family and a very demand job and kids and cats I had to purchase a subscription to YouTube Red so that I could watch Casey’s videos on or offline. Google is getting $10 bucks a month off me of because of Casey!

My keyboarding fingers ached to follow along coding as Casey coded. I used to be a C/C++ programmer. I used to do pointer arithmetic and #DEFINEs and even Win32 development! Could I too write a video game from scratch with no frameworks? I had to buy a Windows laptop and find out! Thus Dell got me to buy a refurbished XPS 13 because of Casey!

Even Microsoft benefited. I subscribed to Office 365 for OneDrive so I could easily backup my files and use the Office apps since I’m keeping my MacBook Pro at the office these days. I have discovered that a Windows PC does almost everything a MacBook does because of Casey!

I usually have less than an hour a day to watch TV so I’ve had to optimize my entertainment and computing environment around Handmade hero because at this rate I will never catch up to the live stream! But I’m having a blast and learning deep insights from a journeyman coder.

What could an old school game coder teach an old battle-scared industry vet like me? More than I could have imagined.

First of call Casey is an opinionated software developer with a narrow focus and an idiosyncratic coding style. He is not wasting his time following the endless trends of modern coding. He is not worried about which new JavaScript dialect he is going master this month or which new isometric web framework he is going wrestle with. He codes in C with some C++ extensions, he uses Emacs as his editor, he builds with batch files, and debugs with VisualStudio. While these tools have changed over the years Casey has not. He is nothing if not focused.

Thus Casey is a master of extemporaneous coding while explaining–the kind that every software engineer fears during Google and Facebook interviews. This means Casey has his coding skills down cold. He is unflappable.

Casey doesn’t know everything and his technique for searching MSDN while writing code shows how fancy IDEs with auto-completion are actually bad for us developers. He uses the Internet (and Google search) not as a crutch to copy and paste code but as a tool to dig deep into how APIs and compilers actually work. There seems to be nothing Casey can’t code himself.

Casey makes mistakes and correct himself. He writes // Notes and // TODOs in his code to follow up with as if he is working with team. Casey interacts with his audience at the end of every stream and is not shy about either dismissing their questions or embracing them. Casey is becoming a better, more knowledgeable programming before our eyes and we’re helping him while he is helping us.

Casey is not cool or suave on camera. He swigs almond milk and walks away off screen to get stuff during the stream. But nothing about Handmade Hero would be substantially improved if Casey hired a professional video production team. In point of fact, any move away from his amateur production values would be met with suspicion from his audience. Any inorganic product placement would fail. Dell, Microsoft, and Google should support him but stay the heck away least they burst the bubble of pure peer-to-peer show-and-tell that surrounds Casey.

I have 249 videos go to (and Casey has not stopped making videos)! I still don’t know if he delivers on his promise and creates an actual video game from scratch. (Please! No spoilers!) But I already know far more than I did about real-world game development where the gritty reality of incompatible file systems and operating platform nuances make Object Oriented Programming and interpreted bytecode luxuries a working developer can’t afford.

 

3 Replies to “Binge Watching Handmade Hero”

  1. I completely agree with everything you said. I’ve been watching and coding along from scratch. It’s a ton of fun! In case you didn’t know, you can speed up the YouTube playback speed to 1.25x or possibly 1.5x and still take it all in at a good pace. Casey sometimes speaks a little too slow for my liking. However sometimes he’s really fired up, so the 1.5x increase will turn him into a code slinging chipmunk.

  2. Absolutely amazin stuff.
    You know about the indexed chapter guide right? It’s like an oldschool programming encyclopedia! 🙂
    I’m one of those C/C++ veterans you mentioned and I was absolutely hooked from the very first episode. I had to binge watch a LOT of episodes to catch up but man is it worth it.
    This series even inspired me to finally start my own game engine from scratch following the core phylosophy even if I have my own style and objectives, but this thing should really be taught in schools. Oh, man, if only something like this existed back when I was in college! x)
    It really tells you something about modern/mainstream programming that this kind of thing is somewhat “niche”.
    Oh well… xP

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