Categories
Management & Leadership

No Modes

Larry Tesler died this week. He was one of my idols at Apple Computer in the 1990s. A brilliant thought leader and champion of the idea that modes are a bad user experience.

A mode is a context for getting work (or play) done. In the early days of computers, before graphical user interfaces, applications were broken into “operational modes” such as edit, navigate, and WYSIWYG. Key commands would perform different actions in different modes. To be a great computer user, you had to memorize all the modes and all the corresponding key sequences. Modality made software easier to write but made computers harder to learn and use.

Larry Tesler was a visionary who focused on making the software do the hard work and not the user. The Apple Lisa, Macintosh, and Newton were great examples of modeless computing—as was Microsoft Windows.

Some folks, developers like me, will tell you that modal software is better. Once you get over the hurtle of memorizing the modes and commands, your fingers never have to leave the keyboard. And with modal software, as they will enthusiastically explain, you can easily perform power user operations like repeating commands and global pattern matching. I think this is true for software developers and maybe true as well for lawyers or novelists. Modal tools like Emacs and Vim make big file tasks fast and simple.

The alternative to modal software for large document management is something like MS Word. Many users think MS Word is bloated and slow. Given all that MS Word does modelessly it’s is a speedy racer! Most of us don’t need the power of MS Word (or Emacs or Vim) everyday.

You can thank Larry Tesler for championing the idea that modes are not required for most users most of the time. Thus you can grab your phone and just start typing out a message and get a call without saving your message. After the call is complete you can go back to your typing. If you want you can multitask typing and talking at the same time (hopefully you are not driving).

Behind the scenes your phone is doing an intricate dance to enable this apparent modelessness. The message app is suspended and the message is saved just encase the app crashes. The call app comes to the front and takes over the screen. During the call you can return to the message app while the call is running in the background. Other apps suspend to make room for the message app and call app to operate at the same time. Before Larry Tesler it was not uncommon for the user to have to do all this coordination manually.

To enable modeless software, applications have to share resources and the operating system has to help apps know when and what to do. In the old days this was called “event driven multitasking”. Now it’s just called software development.

How did Larry accomplish all this? Well, he wasn’t alone. But he worked hard, advocating for the user at Apple even when the cost of modeless software drove up costs. He even had a few minutes to spend with a junior employee like me. He wanted to make sure I understood the value of a great user experience. And it worked! I supported OpenDoc, the ultimate modeless user experience, and I made sure we had a version of ClarisWorks based on it. But alas the Macintosh (or PC) computers of the mid 1990s just could not handle the complexity of OpenDoc and it never shipped.

Still, to this day, I am grateful to Larry and the whole Apple Computer experience. It is the ground upon which I stand.

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Uncategorized

XML and Immortal Docments

I just read Jeff Haung’s A Manifesto for Preserving Content on the Web. He made some good suggestions (seven of them) to help keep web content available as technical progress works hard to erase everything digital that has gone before.

I don’t know if everything published to the web deserves to be saved but much of it does and it’s a shame that we don’t have some industry standard way to preserve old websites. Jeff notes the that Wayback Machine and Archive.org preserve some content but are subject to the same dilemma as the rest of web–eventually every tech dies of it’s native form of link rot.

For longer than I care to admit (11 years!), I’ve been posting my own thoughts to my own WordPress instance. But one day WordPress or me will depart this node of existence. I’m considering migration to a hosted solution and something like Jekyll. That may well postpone the problem but not solve it. I could archive my words on a CD of some sort. But will my decedents be able to parse WordPress or Jekyll or any contemporary file format?

While I like the idea of printing PDFs to stone tablets from a perversity stand point what is really needed is a good articulation of the problem and a crowd sourced, open source solution.

Jeff’s first suggestion is pretty good: “return to vanilla HTML/CSS.” But what is version of HTML/CSS is vanilla? The original version? The current version? Tomorrow’s version? That is the problem with living tech! It keeps evolving!

I would like to suggest XML 1.1. It’s not perfect but its stable (i.e. pretty dead, unlikely to change), most web documents can be translated into it, and most importantly we have it already.

I know that XML is complex and wordy. I would not recommend XML for your web app’s config file format or build system’s make file. But as an archiving format I think XML would be pretty good.

If all our dev tools, from IDEs to blog editors, dumped an archive version of our output as XML, future archaeologists could easily figure out how to resurrect our digital expressions.

As an added bonus, an archive standard based on XML would help services like Wayback Machine and archive.org do their jobs more easily.

Even better, it would be cool if we all chip in to create a global XML digital archive. An Esperanto for the the divergent digital world! We could keep diverging our tech with a clear conscious and this archive would be the place for web browsers and search engines to hunt for the ghosts of dead links.

Now there are all sorts of problems with this idea. Problems of veracity and fidelity. Problems of spam and abuse. We would have to make the archive uninteresting to opportunists and accept some limitations. A good way to solve these type of problems is to limit the archive to text-only written in some dead language, like Latin, where it would would be too much effort to abuse (or that abuse would rise to the level of fine art).

What about the visual and audio? Well, it could be described. Just like we (are supposed to do) for accessibility. The descriptions could be generated by machine learning (or people, I’m not prejudiced against humans). It just has to be done on the fly without out human initiation or intervention.

Perfect! Now, everything time I release an app, blog post, or video clip, an annotated text description written in Latin and structured in XML is automagically archived in the permanent collection of human output.