Categories
Nerd Fun Programming Self Improvement

Binge Watching Handmade Hero

Screenshot (1)

For the last several weeks I’ve been obsessed with one TV show. It’s changed my viewing habits, my buying habits, and my computing habits. Technically it’s not even a “TV show” (if your definition of that term doesn’t include content created by non-professionals that is only available for free over the Internet).

But for me, a more or less typical Gen-Xer, Handmade Hero by game tool developer Casey Muratori has me totally enthralled as only must see TV can enthrall. I’m hooked and I simply must watch all 256+ episodes of Handmade Hero before I die (in about 1,406 Saturdays according to the How Many Saturdays app).

So first off let me explain a few things. Unless you are an aspiring retro game programmer or aging C/C++ programmer Handmade Hero will seem tedious at best and irrelevant at worst. There are much better and more modern ways to make a video game (like SpriteKit on iOS or Unity on any OS) but Casey promises to demonstrate live on Twitch.TV how to write a complete video game from scratch, without modern frameworks, that will run on almost anything with a CPU. He’s starting with Windows but promises Mac OS X, Linux, and Raspberry Pi.

This is a bold promise! When I first heard of Handmade hero, almost 2 years ago I ignored it. I didn’t know who Casey Muratori was and the Internet is littered with hundreds of these solo projects that tend to fissile out like ignobly failed Kickstarter projects.

But a comment in Hacker News caught my eye about a month ago. Casey had delivered hundreds of hours of live coding with explanations of arcane C, Windows, and video programming techniques! It’s all archived on YouTube and he’s still steaming almost every night! Awesomesause!

So I had to check it out. I started with Casey’s first video, Intro to C on Windows, and ate it up. I had to pound through the rest of that week’s archive. Because I have a family and a very demand job and kids and cats I had to purchase a subscription to YouTube Red so that I could watch Casey’s videos on or offline. Google is getting $10 bucks a month off me of because of Casey!

My keyboarding fingers ached to follow along coding as Casey coded. I used to be a C/C++ programmer. I used to do pointer arithmetic and #DEFINEs and even Win32 development! Could I too write a video game from scratch with no frameworks? I had to buy a Windows laptop and find out! Thus Dell got me to buy a refurbished XPS 13 because of Casey!

Even Microsoft benefited. I subscribed to Office 365 for OneDrive so I could easily backup my files and use the Office apps since I’m keeping my MacBook Pro at the office these days. I have discovered that a Windows PC does almost everything a MacBook does because of Casey!

I usually have less than an hour a day to watch TV so I’ve had to optimize my entertainment and computing environment around Handmade hero because at this rate I will never catch up to the live stream! But I’m having a blast and learning deep insights from a journeyman coder.

What could an old school game coder teach an old battle-scared industry vet like me? More than I could have imagined.

First of call Casey is an opinionated software developer with a narrow focus and an idiosyncratic coding style. He is not wasting his time following the endless trends of modern coding. He is not worried about which new JavaScript dialect he is going master this month or which new isometric web framework he is going wrestle with. He codes in C with some C++ extensions, he uses Emacs as his editor, he builds with batch files, and debugs with VisualStudio. While these tools have changed over the years Casey has not. He is nothing if not focused.

Thus Casey is a master of extemporaneous coding while explaining–the kind that every software engineer fears during Google and Facebook interviews. This means Casey has his coding skills down cold. He is unflappable.

Casey doesn’t know everything and his technique for searching MSDN while writing code shows how fancy IDEs with auto-completion are actually bad for us developers. He uses the Internet (and Google search) not as a crutch to copy and paste code but as a tool to dig deep into how APIs and compilers actually work. There seems to be nothing Casey can’t code himself.

Casey makes mistakes and correct himself. He writes // Notes and // TODOs in his code to follow up with as if he is working with team. Casey interacts with his audience at the end of every stream and is not shy about either dismissing their questions or embracing them. Casey is becoming a better, more knowledgeable programming before our eyes and we’re helping him while he is helping us.

Casey is not cool or suave on camera. He swigs almond milk and walks away off screen to get stuff during the stream. But nothing about Handmade Hero would be substantially improved if Casey hired a professional video production team. In point of fact, any move away from his amateur production values would be met with suspicion from his audience. Any inorganic product placement would fail. Dell, Microsoft, and Google should support him but stay the heck away least they burst the bubble of pure peer-to-peer show-and-tell that surrounds Casey.

I have 249 videos go to (and Casey has not stopped making videos)! I still don’t know if he delivers on his promise and creates an actual video game from scratch. (Please! No spoilers!) But I already know far more than I did about real-world game development where the gritty reality of incompatible file systems and operating platform nuances make Object Oriented Programming and interpreted bytecode luxuries a working developer can’t afford.

 

Categories
Nerd Fun Programming

In Defense of Bubble Sort

Bubble sort is an algorithm with a very bad reputation. Robert Sedgwick, in Algorithms in C, notes that bubble sort is “an elementary sorting method” and “it does much more work” than it needs to. Donald Knuth is much more harsh when he states “the bubble sort seems to have nothing to recommend it, except a catchy name…” in the Art of Computer Programming.

Like a an actor valued only for his good looks bubble sort is an algorithm an enterprising coder should probably not admire.

Why is bubble sort so bad? Why does decent computer society advise young and impressionable software engineers avoid it? Why am I devoting a whole blog post to the ugliest sorting algorithms?

TIL: You can learn more from the flawed than you can from the flawless.

I’m not going to tell you why bubble sort is so bad. But before you google it why not try to figure out on your own?

The truth is that modern programmers don’t usually implement any standard sorting routines on the job—even the good ones! Generally there exists a collection class or library that is well written and well tested. If you have a mentor she will tell you not to bother with your own interpretations of the standard body of algorithms. That problem as been solved.

However, I think you’re missing out. Knowing now to implement well known algorithms can help you understand when to use them, what their strengths and weaknesses are, and how to talk about them. Like in a job interview.

Bubble sort is a great place to start. In order to understand why it’s so bad you have to understand big O notation, how algorithms are classified, and how the ordering of input data impacts the performance of an algorithm.

It’s my opinion that bubble sort is only the most terribad sorting method in the platonic world of absolute randomly unordered data. Bubble sort is actually very appropriate for error detection or for data that is already mostly sorted. You know, the kind of data that you are likely to run into in real life.

// Bubble sort

func bubble(inputList:[Int]) -> [Int] {
    var l = inputList
    var t = 0
    var swapped = false
    
    repeat {
        swapped = false
        for var i = 1; i < l.count; i++ {
            if l[i-1] > l[i] {
                t = l[i-1]
                l[i-1] = l[i]
                l[i] = t
                swapped = true
            }
        }
    } while swapped
    return l

}

var results: [Int]

var randomList = [5,2,7,8,1,9,0,3,4,6]
results = bubble(randomList)

var orderedList = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]
results = bubble(orderedList)

var semiorderList = [0,1,2,3,4,9,6,8,5,7]
results = bubble(semiorderList)
Categories
Programming

Identity used to sign executable no longer valid

The last thing I wanted to do on a Sunday morning is write a blog post about an an Xcode executable problem. What I had planned to do is test my most recent Swift 2.0 SpriteKit game on my iPad and iPhone. Last night I got a “Identity used to sign the executable is no longer valid” error when attempting to run my code on a real device. Since it was around midnight I took the message a notification that bedtime had arrived. Besides, a quick search on StackOverflow would surely solve the problem and if I got on SO now I would be up all night nosing around.

This morning I got the same message and found a post on SO that started  four years ago with two pages of answers: The identity used to sign the executable is no longer valid. It’s been viewed 66K times and covers many ancient versions of Xcode. The top answer simply said to restart Xcode. Indeed, restarting, rebooting, or re-installing is always a great answer! So I tried the first two (restarting Xcode and rebooting all my devices) but no joy. And it’s a cheap answer. 99% of computer problems are temporarily solved by powering down and up the server or device but the root cause sits like a malignant elf in the machine, biding it’s time, ready to strike again.

So I figured it out. My problem, in any case.

Last week I was giving a talk at SUNY Buffalo (shout out to Prof. Hartloff). It’s just far enough away from NYC that I had to stay overnight. I took a MacBook Pro that I don’t ordinarily use for development. When I was working on my new game and testing it my iPad and iPhone (to get actual frame rates and the feel of touching the screen) Xcode discovered that I didn’t have an iOS development certificate on that MacBook and asked me if I wanted to revoke my current cert or copy it over from another machine. Since I didn’t have it I said revoke. Xcode did what ever it does and created me a new iOS dev cert associated with that particular MacBook Pro.

Note to Apple: There has to be a better way for Apple certified developers to manage their certificates in this age of clouds and connectivity. Can’t these certs reside on Infinite Loop server?

Enough backstory!

If you get the dreaded “Identity used to sign executable no longer valid” error and restarting your Xcode doesn’t work here are the steps that should fix it for good.

Go to your Apple developer account certificate overview and read carefully and completely about how to manually manage certs and provision devices. Once you understand what you need to do it’s relatively simple.

  1. Revoke and delete all the could certs and profiles of devices you no longer own that have build up over the years. Clean it all up.
  2. Then, following the instructions from Apple recreate your iOS development and distribution certificates.
  3. Re-provision your iOS devices.
  4. Download your certs and provisioning files and reinstall them into your Mac’s keychain.
  5. Clean and build your app.
  6. Now it should run on the iOS devices you’ve provisioned nicely.

Note to You: Xcode is no longer managing your certs and profiles. But that’s OK. It was doing a bad job anyway.

Post Script

Why didn’t I post this info to Stack Overflow? Because this is a pretty radical solution, not without risk. SO, for better or worse, has been come the place for copy and paste solutions that have not aged gracefully over time. Don’t get me wrong–I love Stack Overflow, recommend it, and use it all the time. But sometimes it’s not safe to post an answer to a problem that requires reading comprehension.

Lucky for you and me, my unpopular blog post will probably be the last item in your search for solutions to apple certification problems.

Categories
Nerd Fun Programming

Four Tips for Xcode Storyboard Users


Apple’s Xcode Storyboard is both your best friend and your worst enemy when it comes to developing state-of-the-art iOS, Mac OS X, tvOS, and watchOS apps. Sometimes, what would be really hard, like associating a function with a gesture is quick and easy. Sometimes, what should be easy, like toggling a property, requires hunting down a checkbox in an inspector that only shows up with the proper object selected.

Below are three common problems with Xcode Storyboards and what works for me to resolve them. Xcode Storyboard evolves with every release: these tips work for Xcode 7.1.1.

1. Is your Storyboard rendering as XML source code and not graphics?

Screen Shot 2015-11-23 at 9.56.10 AM

Somehow, someway Xcode magically switches the view of a storyboard from Interface Builder – Storyboard to Source Code. No matter, just secondary-click on the name of the storyboard in the Project Navigator and select Open As -> Interface Builder – Storyboard.

What is an Interface Builder? Back when the Mac OS X was the NextStep OS Interface Builder was a developer tool for creating views. This ancient app lives on the deep sub-basement of Xcode and sometimes unexpectedly appears.

2. Is your app blank in the simulator?

Screen Shot 2015-11-23 at 8.57.25 PM

It might be that you need to select your main view controller in Main.storyboard and set the “Is Initial View Controller” checkbox in the Attributes Inspector.

This usually happens when you have deleted the default view controller on a storyboard. You know, when you want to start over.

If the default storyboard is still around you can drag the Storyboard Entry Point arrow from the original view controller to point to your main view controller.

3. Having a hard time control-dragging between UI objects and the Document Outline?

Screen Shot 2015-11-23 at 9.13.06 PM

You’re not alone! You can use the Connections Inspector to drag-create connections without holding down the control key.

In the inspector just drag from the circle to the controller that you want to your UI object connected with.

Make sure you have the correct UI object on the storyboard and/or in the Document Outline selected so you connect the right things together.

4. Auto layout constraint values driving you batty?

Screen Shot 2015-11-23 at 9.14.46 PM

Setting up constraints is one of the most unintuitive parts of Xcode’s storyboards. Part of the problem is there a several ways to do it and Xcode doesn’t always seem to do what you ask it to do. Don’t worry! You can use the Document Outline to selection each individual constraint and adjust it’s values in the Size Inspector.

Generally I use the Align or Pin menus to initially set the auto layout constrains for an UI object.

Then I use the Resolve Auto Layout Issues menu to make the UI object conform to the initial constraint values with Update Frames.

Finally, since the UI object always looks weird I select each constraint in the Document Outline, adjust it in the Size Inspect, or delete it and start over.

There you go Xcoders! If I thinking of anything else I’ll update this post!

Categories
Nerd Fun Programming

Fun with Core Graphics and Swift Part 2

Screen Shot 2015-11-09 at 9.24.06 PM

Hey, you have 10 minuets, don’t you?

Then you can add pinch and rotate gestures to our fake-genigraphics app. I didn’t realize it would be this easy. But sometimes Apple’s developer tools engineering team does something amazing–and gesture recognizers are super amazing.

A good way to start is to read the UIGestureRecognizer Tutorial on Ray Wenderlich’s website. I’ve said good things about Ray before. I don’t know him. However, Ray and his team of technical authors just have a way of spelling things out 100 times more clearly than Apple’s developer documentation.

After you’ve read the tutorial open up ViewController.swift in the fake-genigraphics project. Delete the boilerplate code in the ViewController class and replace it with the following code (from the tutorial):

    @IBAction func handlePinch(recognizer : UIPinchGestureRecognizer) {
        if let view = recognizer.view {
            view.transform = CGAffineTransformScale(view.transform,
                recognizer.scale, recognizer.scale)
            recognizer.scale = 1
        }
    }
    
    @IBAction func handleRotate(recognizer : UIRotationGestureRecognizer) {
        if let view = recognizer.view {
            view.transform = CGAffineTransformRotate(view.transform, recognizer.rotation)
            recognizer.rotation = 0
        }
    }

Each of these functions is decorated with the @IBAction tag. That means we’re going to hook them up to events from our project’s Main.storyboard. This part still vexes me. I want to do everything in code and not use drag and drop to wire up events with functions (and properties with variables). Especially since I am left handed and to do a key part of the drag and drop I have to use the control key which only exists on the left side of my nifty Apple Magic Keypad.

Enough whining. Time to drag and drop!

Open up your Main.storyboard in the fake-genigraphics project. In the Object Library on the right find the section near the bottom with all the gesture recognizers. Drag a Pinch Gesture Recognizer out from the library and drop it on the BackgroundView in the storyboard. Now for the hard part: In the Document Outline on the left control-drag the Pinch Gesture Recognizer entry up and drop it on the ViewController entry. On the pop-up menu that suddenly appears choose Sent Actions Handle Pinch. (So weird).

Do these same steps again with the Rotation Gesture Recognizer. What you are doing is connecting events from the gesture recognizers to the functions in the ViewController marked with @IBAction.

Guess What? You’re done! Run your app in the simulator and on your iPhone or iPad. You can now zoom in and out and rotate the Background View like a pro. Notice how responsive and smooth the animation is. Alas there seems to be limits on how far you can zoom out. And you can’t rotate and zoom at the same time. I have trouble with rotating with my left hand. I’m convinced that nobody at Apple is left handled!

Categories
Nerd Fun Programming

Fun with Core Graphics and Swift

Screen Shot 2015-11-07 at 12.15.12 AM

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away… I was a computer graphics artist. Specifically I was a Genigraphics
console operator. I worked the night shift creating illustrations and slides with vector graphics for big corporations. This was the early 1980s and fast, cheap personal computers with color graphics had not quite been invented yet. Later when I learned to program the Apple Macintosh I had a head start–I had created hundreds of vector images using computer graphic primitives by hand! The ability to draw lines, circles, and rectangles with code blew my mind.

I’m thinking it would be fun to do some graphics exercises with Swift and Apple’s Core Graphics. Maybe recreate some of those Genigraphics images from 30 years ago. Somewhere in the basement I have a box of 35mm slides and 8″ floppy disks. Probably not readable but I should be able to create a few images from memory. Genigraphics was the ancient ancestor of PowerPoint and Keynote. Every element in an illustration or on a slide had to be created from a graphic primitive. A gradient color fill was created with 30 or 40 overlapping rectangles, each with an incrementally different color.  And remember all the primitives were created by a human hand!

One of the most time consuming effects involved creating a grid for a background. It involved much duplicating, aligning, and counting.

So let’s create a clunky Genigraphcis grid in Swift using Core Graphics and display it in a UIView on and iOS device!

Launch Xcode and create a new iOS single view application. Make sure you choose Swift as the language. It doesn’t matter what you call your app. Run the new blank app just to make sure Xcode did it’s job.

Kill the app and go back to Xcode. Create a new iOS Cocoa Touch Class source file. Call it BackgroundView and make it a subclass of UIView. Go to your main.storyboard and select the View in your View Controller. In the Identity Inspector set the class of the View to BackgroundView.

Run the app again just make sure it builds and then kill it and return to Xcode.

Select BackgroundView.swift. You should see a drawRect function provided by Apple. Delete all the comments so it’s ready for some grid code…

override func drawRect(rect: CGRect) {

}

This function is called whenever iOS needs to paint your view on the screen. The rect is the area that needs to be painted. The first time drawRect is called the rect is the same size as your view. Later on when drawRect is called the rect is just the area of the view that needs to be updated. So I get the view width and height from the bounds. I’m also assuming the origin (left, top corner) is always 0,0. Add the following code to your drawRect function so you can get the the bounds width and height and compare it to the rect (technically called the “dirty rect” because that is the part of the view that needs to redrawn).

        let viewWidth:CGFloat = self.bounds.width
        print("viewWidth \(viewWidth)")
        print("rect.size.width \(rect.size.width)")
        
        let viewHight:CGFloat = self.bounds.height
        print("viewHight \(viewHight)")
        print("rect.size.height \(rect.size.height)")

I like to define all my important variables together near the top of my functions because I always know where to find them. Swift let’s you declare and define variable throughout the code. (I only use that freedom for unimportant “throw away” variables that are used inside loops and other control structures.)

Add the code to define your gridlines starting points, lengths, and line width.

        let x1:CGFloat = 0.0
        let x2:CGFloat = viewWidth
        
        let y1:CGFloat = 0.0
        let y2:CGFloat = viewHight

Core Graphics likes all your coordinates to be CGFloats. Since the resolution of an iOS device can be just about anything size these coordinates represent an idealize space as points. On a high resolution iOS device, like an iPhone 6s Plus you’re going to get 3 pixels for every point. My iPhone 6 Plus has a resolution of 1242 × 2208 but Core Graphics gives me 414 × 736 to work with. I’m just going to live with that for now.

I want a nice square grid so I use the either the viewWidth or viewHeight (which ever is smaller) divided 15 as the length of a grid cell.

        let cellLength:CGFloat = min(viewHight, viewWidth) / 15
        print("rowHeight \(cellLength)")

Now it’s time to set the style of our lines: color and width. As I recall Genigraphics only had 64 colors or maybe 128. I’ll figure that out next weekend. In the meantime I choose blue with a width of 2.

        let lineWidth:CGFloat = 2.0
        
        let context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext()
        let colorSpace = CGColorSpaceCreateDeviceRGB()
        
        let components: [CGFloat] = [0.0, 0.0, 1.0, 1.0]
        let color = CGColorCreate(colorSpace, components)
        
        CGContextSetLineWidth(context, lineWidth)
        CGContextSetStrokeColorWithColor(context, color)

Wow! That’s a lot of code just to set the color and line width. It’s a little complicated because Core Graphics is context-based. You have to get the current graphics context and modify it to draw. In the code above I’m also creating a color the hard way via a color space and RGBA (Red Green Blue Alpha) color values. All this work will let me have a fine degree of control of the color of the gridlines later on.

Finally, I’m going to draw my horizontal and vertical gridlines!

        // draw horizontal lines
        var i:CGFloat = 0.0
        repeat {
          
            CGContextMoveToPoint(context, x1, cellLength + i)
            CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, x2, cellLength + i)
            
            i = i + cellLength
            
        } while i < rect.height - cellLength
        
        
        // draw vertical lines
        var j:CGFloat = 0.0
        repeat {
            
            CGContextMoveToPoint(context, cellLength + j, y1)
            CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, cellLength + j, y2)
            
            j = j + cellLength
            
        } while j < rect.width - cellLength

I’m just fooling around at this point so I don’t know if two repeat loops is the most efficient way to draw a grid. Right now I’m just happy to see a grid show up. I’ll optimize it later–if needed! To draw my lines I start at 0 and draw each line a cellLengh apart. CoreGraphics is a bit like Logo’s turtle graphics: I have to add drawing commands to the context, building up the image step by step behind the scenes.

If you run the code that this you will see nothing! Go ahead… I dare you!

That’s because you need to tell the graphics context to blast your drawing commands from the context on to the view. One line of code does it.

        CGContextStrokePath(context)

If you have been typing along you now have a custom UIView that draws a grid properly no matter now you hold your iPhone.

If you want to see the grid on your storyboard add

@IBDesignable

just above the class declaration. But be careful! Buggy Core Graphics rendering can freeze up Xcode. (It happened to me while writing this code.) I keep @IBDesignable commented out until I know my drawing code is working.

You can find all the code on GitHub.

Next week I’ll add some more complex drawing in the OG Genigraphics style. This is a good start for your own explorations. Have fun and don’t worry! You can’t blow up your computer by writing code.

Categories
Programming Tech Trends

The Desktop Strikes Back

Darth vs Obi Wan

I was surprised and delighted by Microsoft’s introduction of the Surface Pro 4 and and Surface Book. I have a feeling that Microsoft is doing something really interesting: Bringing back the general purpose personal computer. Wait, wait, I know what you are thinking! It’s all about the phones and pads and the Internet of things! I get it! I’m not some old guy pining for the days when PC were king and 640K RAM was a luxury. Well, actually, I am that old guy. But I have not personally coded a desktop app, native or web, since 2010. Everything thing I do for work or play is meant for mobile devices. I’m usually the guy in the conference room saying “We need to focus on Mobile!” and “kids today don’t even know what a desktop is.”

But Microsoft and some of the recent changes to Mac OS X in El Capitan are making me think there is some life yet left in the PC.

While Apple is targeting coffee shop-consumers by making MacBooks  lighter but less powerful or targeting highly specialized markets with high-resolution workstations, Microsoft has reminded me that there is a vast middle in this market. And that middle is still mostly using desktops that run Windows. There hasn’t been growth in the middle for a while but then again there hasn’t been much product to spur growth.

Every year I want to buy a new phone. I swear have every iPhone model in a drawer starting with number 3. But buying a new computer is something I do only when I absolutely must. There just isn’t any reason to upgrade a contemporary desktop or laptop. And looking at where Apple and Dell and other PC manufacturers were going it seemed to me that PC were just getting specialized. The middle ground was a nomad’s land of crappy plastic slow PC encircled by ultra-lights and gaming rigs.

A while back I bought a Surface Pro 3 with it’s pen, keyboard cover, and Windows OS. I found it… interesting. A had to pair it with an Apple Wireless Bluetooth Keyboard to get a decent typing experience. And Windows 10 is still a little rough. Ok, Windows 10 is a lot rough. And confusing. But it getting better.

I feel a great nostalgia for all things from the original Bill Gates/Steve Jobs era. I will probably end up acquiring a Surface Pro 4 or a Surface Book. I’m pretty sure either of those products will not displace my iMac 5K as my go-to general purpose computer for coding, blogging, podcast editing, and cartooning. (Everything else I do, I do on my iPhone.)

But heck, I want Microsoft to win here and bring the PC back to the forefront of the consumer electronics revolution. So here are five suggestions or tips for MS that would have me running to the Microsoft Store as if they were selling Tesla Model Xs at a deep discount!

Tip 1: Really rethink Windows and the UX of a desktop operating system.

I know MS got in trouble for removing the Start Menu. But seriously: There is no Start Menu in Mac OS X or iOS because for the most part the whole operating system is the Start Menu. Go back and look at the Xerox Star if you have to. Don’t try to mask complexity with a handful of easy-to-use screens hiding the real OS. When I worked at Apple we had a saying: “Every pixel counts.” It’s clear to me that on Windows some pixels count more than others.

Tip 2: Bring back desk accessories

I know that both Apple and Microsoft have failed at providing consumers with a library of little single-purpose applets that share the desktop with the bigger multipurpose applications. But, as guy who once wrote a mildly popular Yahoo Widget, there is real consumer value in DAs. I think the original Mac OS and PC DOS got it right: Apple’s Desk Accessories and Borland’s Sidekick provided little utility functions that were easy to access, simple to use, and fast to summon and hide. By contrast Apple’s Dashboard Widgets and Microsoft’s Desktop Gadgets were slow and clunky. These decedents of the desk accessory were too ambitious and missed the whole point. I want “info at my finger tips.”

Tip 3: Fix the menu bar or retire it

I was so excited when Mac OS X El Capitan enabled me to hide not only the taskbar but the menu bar as well. I hate the menu bar! It’s usually a dumping ground for every feature of an app randomly arranged. Long ago the menu bar had a formal structure. It was drilled into my head as a young software developer that menu titles were nouns and menu bar items were verbs. If I had a document menu then all the menu items were the operations that could be performed on documents. But right from the get-go both Apple and Microsoft ignored that simple and powerful idea. Almost all Windows and Mac apps have separate “File” and “Document” menus. I know that files are those objects that computer applications store data into but we tell consumers to call those things documents. Everyone is confused. And then there is the universal “Edit” menu which should be called the “Selection” menu. This might seem like small potatoes but I’ve learned trivial details are the stumbling blocks that kill product adoption.

Tip 4: Make the desktop a first class entity

Most flavors of Unix are doing the Desktop right and Apple and Microsoft are starting to get clued in. It should be very easy to set up and arrange windows on a desktop and have them stay that way for eternity. Like really forever and definitely between restarts and system updates. Adobe understands this and gives each of its apps a layout manager that allows artists to personalize and save their workspace. Context is everything. Humans are dumber in unfamiliar contexts and smarter in well known contexts. A desktop is really just a context of virtual objects. I think phones are easier to use, not because they are better designed than PCs, but because they naturally just have one context, one screen, at a time.

Tip 5: A list of five more tips

Bonus round!

  1. Don’t go too far trying to make the desktop UX the same as the mobile UX. They are two different use cases. Shortcut keys, content menus, and over lapping windows are great features and can’t really be replaced by gestures, hard presses, and split screens.
  2. Bring back BASIC or Hypercard or some kind of programming environment intelligent non-computer scientists can utilize to create real apps on their own. It’s not about workflow automation. Do not copy Apple’s lame Automator or evil AppleScript.
  3. Clean up your Windows Store. Be even more picky than Apple. Keep out the spam, copy cats, and useless garbage. But make sure users can continue to download and install non-certified apps. I know it’s risky but it’s also capitalism.
  4. Reactivate Windows third party developer base, not by enabling quick and dirty ports of websites into Windows apps but by continuing to empower and simplify and open Visual Studio. I went to one of the very first Windows developer events in Redmond in the early 90s. I got to shake Bill’s hand. I’m sure he doesn’t remember me but I really wanted to write Windows apps after that.
  5. Continue to revive and refine the general purpose personal computer that is great for everything and works for everybody. I don’t want or need a workstation. I do want to get a lot of work done. Instead of thinking like Apple, think like the Microsoft that re-packaged and made affordable the hoity toity graphical user interface in an open system for schools, small businesses, and nerdy kids.

Even if Microsoft succeeds with the Surface Pro 4 and Surface Book, the PC market will most likely continue to look to Cupertino and Redmond steal marketshare from each other. But unlike smart phones, pads, and household items with embedded microchips, PCs are programable–by users. And that is something worthy of a battle with the Empire.

Categories
Nerd Fun Programming Uncategorized

The Secret to Swift is Enums

I’ve found the CS193P (Developing iOS 8 Apps with Swift) iTuneU class really helpful in wrapping my old Objective-C head around Apple’s new Swift programming language. Yes, I know we’re at iOS9 but the fundamentals of the class are still relevant and coaxing the code to compile in iOS 9/Swift 2.0 is a fun little last in and of itself.

The big revelation for me is how core Swift’s enums are to understanding and using the language properly. When Apple decided to improve it’s development environment it could have done so in a million different directions. Apple could have just patched up Objective-C. Apple could have moved over to Java or Scala or even JavaScript. (I was hoping for  JavaScript as Node.js and ECMAScript 6 have proved that JavaScript is an industrial strength language with a real future.)

So when I learned that Apple created a new language for iOS and Mac OS X (and now WatchOS and tvOS) application development I was intrigued and disappointed and hopeful all at the same time. Many parts of Swift seems easy and cool but some parts were down right intellectually challenging: Classes and Structs? Super fancy Enums? Optionals? Strings with out a simple function to get their length? What the heck is going on here?

Swift seemed promising. But it was also changing rapidly over the last year. I fooled around with it but when I hit optionals and weak references I realized the language was not going to sugarcoat the problems of null pointers and memory management–it was trying to make them more tractable.

Optionals were especially vexing. var amount: Double? was not a Double. It was a potential Double. Amount! had better be a Double or it would crash my program. If it was’t for Xcode’s automated static code analysis I never would have been able to put the ? and ! in the right places after the right variable names. And I didn’t like that feeling.

But then I found CS193P and Professor Paul Hergarty’s remarkable ability to explain things simply.

Enums in Swift are amazing little machines. They have little in common with C Enum other than you can use them to define collections of related constants. Enums are types with values that evaluate to themselves. But  you can associate a “raw value”, like a number or a string, or more a advanced value, like Tuples or Arrays or Dictionaries. And with advanced types come functions and closures.

Yikes. These are not your father’s Enums. As Professor Hergarty’s says, Swift Enums are types used for when you want to switch between values. And, point of fact, Swift Enums are defined like a Switch structure with case statements. Each of the cases, except with raw values, can be of different types.

And boom! That explains Optionals. When you have a value that could be nonexistent or of some type, an Optional is just an Enum that wraps up it safely so you can pass it around without crashing. ? and ! are just syntactic shortcuts for accessing the different states an Optional variable might be in. Imagining that Optionals are Enums gave me the handle my mind needed to process the whole concept.

In CS193P Professor Paul Hergarty uses an Enum to power his “Calculator Brain”. In any other programming language an Enum would be used to make the code more readable. But in Swift you can use an Enum as the glue to associate states with types with functions. I have a feeling that this Enum-driven mechanism is the cleanest way to write a Swift state machine. It’s still a little rough around the edges and verbose. But it’s a super reusable pattern good not only for the mathematical operations of a calculator but for managing the states of a web server, business application, or game.

//: Playground - noun: a place where people can play

import UIKit
import Foundation

class CalculatorBrain {
    
    enum Op: CustomStringConvertible {
        case Operand(Double)
        case BinaryOperation(String, (Double, Double) -> Double)
        
        var description: String {
            get {
                switch self {
                case .Operand(let operand):
                    return "\(operand)"
                case .BinaryOperation(let symbol, _):
                    return symbol
                }
            }
        }
    }
    
    var opStack = [Op]()
    var knownOps = [String:Op]()
    
    init() {
        func learnOp (op: Op) {
            knownOps[op.description] = op
        }
        
        learnOp(Op.BinaryOperation("*", *))
        learnOp(Op.BinaryOperation("+", +))
        learnOp(Op.BinaryOperation("-", {$1 - $0}))
        learnOp(Op.BinaryOperation("/", {$1 / $0}))
    }
    
    func evaluate() -> Double? {
        let (result, _) = evaluate(opStack)
        return result
    }
    
    func evaluate(ops: [Op]) -> (result: Double?, remainingOps: [Op]) {
        if !ops.isEmpty {
            var remainingOps = ops
            let op = remainingOps.removeLast()
            
            switch op {
            case .Operand(let operand):
                return (operand, remainingOps)
            case .BinaryOperation(_, let operation):
                let op1Evaluation = evaluate(remainingOps)
                if let operand1 = op1Evaluation.result {
                    let op2Evaluation = evaluate(op1Evaluation.remainingOps)
                    if let operand2 = op2Evaluation.result {
                        return (operation(operand1, operand2), op2Evaluation.remainingOps)
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        return (nil, ops)
    }
    
    func pushOperand(operand: Double) -> Double? {
        opStack.append(Op.Operand(operand))
        return evaluate()
    }
    
    func popOperand() -> Double? {
        if !opStack.isEmpty {
            opStack.removeLast()
        }
        return evaluate()
    }
    
    func performOperation(symbol: String) -> Double? {
        if let operation = knownOps[symbol] {
            opStack.append(operation);
        }
        return evaluate()
    }
    
    func showStack() -> String? {
        return opStack.map{ "\($0)" }.joinWithSeparator(" ")
    }
}

var cb = CalculatorBrain()

print(cb.knownOps)

cb.showStack()
cb.pushOperand(1)
cb.pushOperand(2)
cb.performOperation("+")
cb.pushOperand(3)
cb.pushOperand(4)
cb.performOperation("/")
cb.pushOperand(5)
cb.pushOperand(6)
cb.performOperation("*")
cb.pushOperand(7)
cb.pushOperand(8)
cb.performOperation("-")
cb.showStack()

You should watch all the videos in CS193P to get the full picture. But in the meantime I’ve created a simplified version of Professor Hergarty’s CalculatorBrain suitable for a Swift Playground (above). As you fool around with the code keep in mind the following points:

  • CalculatorBain is a class and when it’s instantiated it’s initializer creates a dictionary of operations that it knows about based on type. You can add more known operations by writing a little code in one place. In the sample code the operations for addition, subtraction, division, and multiplication are written very concisely using Swift’s shortcut syntax for closures with default parameter names. (This reminds me of the best features Perl.)
  • The custom type Op is an Enum that is self documenting and has values associated with either a Double (for operands) or a Dictionary (for operations indexed by name). So simple lookups via a case statement are all that is needed to process input and output a result.
  • The two Evaluate functions are recursive, calling each other until every operand or operation needed in the Ops stack is consumed. Evaluate basically does this:
    • Until the Ops stack is empty pull an item off the end of the stack.
    • If that item is an Operand return it and the remainder of the Ops stack.
    • If that item is an operation dig into the Ops stack until you can get two operands and then execute the function associated with the operation using the operands.
    • The return the result with the remaining Ops stack.
  • If I had to write this code without using recursion and without Swift’s muscular Enums, well, there would be a lot more code and it would be more “hard coded”.

The only improvement I can think of would be to declare the known operations as a literal Dictionary. But the Swift compiler isn’t ready for that and complains: “Expression was too complex to be solved in reasonable time”. I guess if Swift can’t do something swiftly it doesn’t want to do it at all!

 

Categories
Programming

Nothing Changes More Swiftly than Apple’s Swift Syntax

Screen Shot 2015-09-24 at 6.39.39 PM
Look at that beautiful Apple Swift code on the right with closures and shorthand argument names! Make’s me smile every time!

I’m enjoying the Stanford University class CS193P: Developing iOS 8 Applications with Swift. It’s free on iTunes U and the instructor Paul Hegarty knows his stuff. He’s a great explainer. I like how first he writes some code in a naive way and then fools around with it, getting it to work and then reworking it like a sculptor with clay. That’s how real programmers work. We write a rough draft of the code, make sure we understand it and then “refactor” it until we’re no longer embarrassed to share it on GitHub.

But even though the class was recorded in 2014 and updated in June of 2015 it’s aging rapidly. We’re already working with Xcode 7 and iOS 9. And all the little minor changes and improvements are adding up.

One problem you might run into is with the second video: More Xcode and Swift, MVC. In this lesson Professor Hegarty wants to show how we can use a form of polymorphism to write clean code. Specifically with Swift supports something that Objective-C did not! In Swift we can have class functions with the same name but different signatures. In the example in the lesson he shows how we can write two versions of performOperation–one that takes two Doubles as arguments and another that takes only a single Double as an argument. Very cool…

Unfortunately this code no longer compiles.

There is an explanation on Stack Overflow (if you can find it). But it’s not really clear as there are a couple of solutions. Perhaps the best solution, like so much on the human side of computer programming, is a matter of taste.

Here is the code and the fix:

    // these functions won't compile with Swift 1.2 and above
    func performOperationWith(operation: (Double, Double) -> Double) {
        if operandStack.count >= 2 {
            displayValue = operation(operandStack.removeLast(), operandStack.removeLast())
            enter()
        }
    }
    
    func performOperationWith(operation: Double -> Double) {
        if operandStack.count >= 1 {
            displayValue = operation(operandStack.removeLast())
            enter()
        }
    }
    // these functions will happily compile
    func performOperationWithTwoOperands(operation: (Double, Double) -> Double) {
        if operandStack.count >= 2 {
            displayValue = operation(operandStack.removeLast(), operandStack.removeLast())
            enter()
        }
    }
    
    func performOperationWithOneOperand(operation: Double -> Double) {
        if operandStack.count >= 1 {
            displayValue = operation(operandStack.removeLast())
            enter()
        }
    }

Because Swift is smart about classes written in Objective-C that you are subclassing from, it forces those subclasses, in this case UIViewController, to obey Objective-C’s limitations. One of those limitation was not allowing polymorphism for methods with the same name but different arguments.

The code is a little uglier, because there is slightly more of it, but it smart of Apple to be as compatible with Objective-C as possible. At least for a few more years 🙂

Categories
Nerd Fun Programming

Lisp Cons Cell and List Cheat Sheet

Lisp Cons Cell and List Diagram

 

A diagram of a nested linked-list and how it is structured in Lisp with Con Cells, Symbols, Pointers, and our old friends CAR and CDR.

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