Categories
Cocos2d-iPhone Programming Sprite Kit

Re-doing Dungeonators

One thing I think all software developers love to do is to make software for “the heck of it.” Hacking something together without having to worry about users, open source community members, and code reviews, is something devs don’t get to do often in these days of test-driven, agile, minimum viable products. Back in 2011 I created an iPhone game just for the heck of it. I wanted to learn about the indy game development process and there isn’t a better way of learning than by doing. I accomplished my mission and uploaded the first version of Dungeonators to Apple’s iTunes App Store in October of 2011. While the game is not very playable, I learned a lot:

  • How to design and implement a realtime game with Objective-C and the Cocos2d-iPhone framework
  • How to create all the art, fonts, sprites, and a spite atlas
  • How to record (or buy) all the sounds and music and use open source tools to transcode audio for a game
  • How to create the mechanics of a game with objects and callbacks while ref counting to manage memory
  • How to test and deploy an iOS game and get something approved in the App Store

Now it’s 2014 and much has changed in the world of indy game development for iOS. Apple’s iOS 7 introduced Sprite Kit which reduces the need for a framework like Cocos2d. Apple also introduced the iPhone 5 and the iPad with Retina, which mean there are four iOS screen resolutions/aspect ratios in common use. Oh, and let’s not forget Flappy Bird and 2048. While writing a hit indy game is still harder than winning the lottery it looks like a couple of people have done it!

Since I’m taking a break between adventures, I thought it would be fun to update Dungeonators for iOS 7 and Sprite Kit. Plus it would be good to make the game universal (available on all iOS devices) and global (available in more than just the United States edition of the App Store). And I should probably make it playable!

The technical part of this plan is relatively easy. iOS 7 is easier to develop with than previous versions of iOS. I can use ARC (automatic reference counting)in addition to manual ref counting. All the music and sound effects should just work fine. My custom Objective-C classes just need some simplifying (I wrote too much code–that’s my bad coding habit). The original Dungeonator’s artwork is all vector-based so rendering it in different resolutions for each iOS device shouldn’t be too hard. Finally, Sprite Kit is remarkably similar to Cocos2d. Porting the scenes, sprites, transitions, and actions will also be easy.

High resolution Dungeonators under development (1136 x 640 pixel rendering)

The hard part is creating a playable game. If you download original version of Dungeonators from the App Store you’ll find it really confusing. How do you play? Where to you touch? What is the goal? I don’t know what I was thinking!

Actually I do know what I was thinking. I was thinking about the inside not the outside. Inside there are classes for characters, strategies, spells, payloads, and matches. Way too much to fit in a casual game. So while I’m porting everything over I’m going to tear out hundreds of lines of code. I’m going to simplify Dungeonators to the point where it doesn’t require a personal demo from me to learn how to play!

I still might not have a playable game but at least it won’t crash anymore!

Categories
Cocos2d-iPhone Programming

Sprite Playground

I wrote a little Cocos2d-iPhone test app and committed the project to GitHub. (Like every dutiful hacker should.) You’re welcome to download the project and fool around with the code.

My goal was to figure out how to create a composite sprite, make sure it could respond to touches, and rotate and move it round the screen. With a little trial and error I got it working. Here’s how I did the hard parts:

I created a sprite from an PNG file and got it’s dimensions:

CCSprite * cocos2dGuy = [CCSprite spriteWithFile:@"avatar_n1_tang.png"];
CGSize spriteSize = cocos2dGuy.textureRect.size;

Then I created a CCNode to be the parent of my sprite sandwich. (I originally tried to use my cocos2dGuy CCSprite as the parent but Cocos2d stacks added on top of partent nodes and I wanted the particle effect under the cocos2dGuy not on top of him.) I set the size of the CCNode to the dimensions of the cocos2dGuy so that when you touch the CCNode it responds as if you’re touching the image. Then I add the CCNode to the layer. It’s also important to set the CCNode’s anchorPoint to the center (0.5, 0.5) as it’s default is bottom-left. CCSprite default to center anchorPoints and I want my CCNode to act like a proper sprite.

CCNode * composite = [CCNode node];
composite.anchorPoint = ccp(0.5,0.5);
composite.contentSize = spriteSize;
composite.position = centerPt;
[self addChild:composite z:0 tag:kCompositeTag];

Next I added the cocos2dGuy sprite to the center of the composite CCNode. These two entities are now both the same size and stacked on top of each other. (It’s probably not necessary for me to set the cocos2dGuy’s anchorPoint and so I’ll remove that line of code down the road.)

cocos2dGuy.anchorPoint = ccp(0.5, 0.5);
CGSize compositeSize = composite.contentSize;
CGPoint compositeCenterPt = ccp(compositeSize.width/2,compositeSize.height/2);
cocos2dGuy.position = compositeCenterPt;
[composite addChild:cocos2dGuy z:1 tag:1];

Finally I created the custom CCParticleSystem from a Particle Designer file and added it to the composite CCNode but at a lower Z value show it shows up under the cocos2dGuy sprite. See how I had to set the position and the anchorPoint to ensure everything lined up.

CCParticleSystem * fx = [ARCH_OPTIMAL_PARTICLE_SYSTEM particleWithFile:@"fireball_small_fast_green.plist"];
fx.anchorPoint = ccp(0.5, 0.5);
fx.position = compositeCenterPt;
fx.duration = kCCParticleDurationInfinity;
fx.scale = 2.0f;
fx.autoRemoveOnFinish = YES;
[composite addChild:fx z:0 tag:1];

Movement and animation are easy in the world of Cocos2d. I really like the visual effect of CCEaseExponentialInOut. It has a nice punch.

Handling touches are bit harder. I had to remember to set self.isTouchEnabled = YES in my init method and override both registerWithTouchDispatcher and ccTouchBegan. The key bit of code for responding to a touch is isTouchForMe:

bool hit = false;
for(CCNode * node in [self children]) {
    if(node.tag == kCompositeTag) {
         hit = CGRectContainsPoint([node boundingBox], touchLocation);
         if (hit) {
             [self hiliteSprite:(CCSprite *)node];
         } else {
             [self turnSprite:(CCSprite *)node andAttackPoint:touchLocation];
         }
    }
}

The main thing here is to give each touchable node a unique tag and test each node in the layer for that tag. If you touch the sprite he inflates for a moment. If you touch an empty part of the screen the sprite turns and launches himself at your finger. Ouch!

Categories
Cocos2d-iPhone Programming

Cocos2d-iPhone Sprite Rotation to an Arbitrary Point

I had some time during the Thanksgiving weekend to work on Dungeonators. I’m hoping to get an upgrade out to the App Store soon. One thing I needed //TODO: is refactor my rather poor implementation of rotating a sprite to face another sprite. My original code worked ok, in a roundabout way, but was ugly and mysterious.

(My iPhone game is full of ugly mysterious code: As I implement my ideas in code I first focus on getting it to work. Then, if I have time I go back and fix it to work cleanly. Generally cleanly means boiling the code down to the fewest number of lines possible, making it as functional as possible, and using functions from the operating system or open source code libraries as much as possible.)

I won’t show you my original sprite rotation implementation. Some things are too gross even for the Internet. Let’s just say it was written as if I was trying to remember high school trigonometry by trial and error.

Instead below is the final implementation, useful to any Cocos2d-iPhone programmer who wants a sprite to rotate to face an opponent at any point on the screen:

- (void) rotateSourceSprite:(CCSprite *)sourceSprite toFaceTargetSprite:(CCSprite *)targetSprite {

    // Calculation
    CGPoint difference = ccpSub(sourceSprite.position, targetSprite.position);
    CGFloat rotationRadians = ccpToAngle(difference);
    CGFloat rotationDegrees = -CC_RADIANS_TO_DEGREES(rotationRadians);
    rotationDegrees += 90.0f;
    CGFloat rotateByDegrees = rotationDegrees - sourceSprite.rotation;

    // animation
    CCRotateBy * turnBy = [CCRotateBy actionWithDuration:0.5f angle:rotateByDegrees];
    CCEaseIn * ease = [CCEaseIn actionWithAction:turnBy rate:4];
    [sourceSprite runAction:ease];
}

And here’s how it works, just incase you’re curious…

  • The method takes a source sprite and as target sprite as parameters. After it runs it will rotate the source to face the target.
  • The calculation part uses Cocos2d helper functions and macros (ccpSub, ccpToAngle, and CC_RADIANS_DEGREES) to figure the maths. In my original implementation I had written my own versions. Using the Cocos2d API makes my code easier to read and perhaps faster.
  • The maths work like this: Create a vector out of the distance between to points. Convert the vector to an angle. Convert the angle from radians to degrees and negate it*. Add 90 degrees to the angle to get the proper orientation. (The +=90.0f value is game specific: My sprites are rotated 90 degrees to start with.) Subtract the penultimate result of the calculation from the current rotation property (angle) of the source sprite to get the final result (the amount to rotate by).
  • The animation, which could easily be factored out into a method of its own, uses Cocos2d’s CCRotateBy and CCEaseIn to turn the source sprite to face the target in half a second. This part didn’t change from the original code. I didn’t factor it out because in my game I always use these two pieces together. I don’t like to do too much work in the abstract because I usually end up making my code too complex.

* The need to negate the value produced by CC_RADIANS_DEGREES is a bit of a mystery to me. If I don’t do it my sprite ends up facing in the opposite direction.

Categories
Cocos2d-iPhone Programming

Cocos2d Tip #2: Using CCTimer in Your iPhone Game

If you’re writing almost any type of game, from a puzzler to a FPS to an RTS, tracking time is critical element of the game play. (Except for Angry Birds. You can ponder an Angry Birds level until your iPhone battery runs dry without penalty.)

Cocos2d-iPhone provides several means for tracking time in your game and scheduling methods to be called at both regular heartbeats and at arbitrary points in the future. The easiest way to manage time in a Cocos2d-based game is to use a CCLayer’s scheduleUpdate or schedule methods. Both methods are explained nicely in the timers section of the Cococ2d Best Practices guide. The guide also explains why you should try to avoid using iOS’s NSTimer class. (Your game will miss out on automatic pause and resume if do use NSTimer.)

But what if you can’t use scheduleUpdate or schedule in your game because you’re putting your game logic into a custom class instead of a CCLayer or CCSprite?

For the sake of simplicity and portability I don’t subclass CCSprite in my games. Instead, I create custom classes to represent my game objects and call update:(ccTime)delta on them from CCLayer objects to make stuff happen. I needed a nice timer class and started to write my own. About halfway though this project I ran into Cocos2d’s CCTimer. Since I’m trying to write as little code as possible I abandoned my timer. CCTimer is a nicely written, lightweight timer class that uses NSInvoker to create callbacks and still integrates will with the rest of the Cocos2d-iPhone framework.

Here’s how it use it…

First, I store a reference to a timer in my non-Cocos2d class:

// Zombie.h
#import "cocos2d.h"
@interface Zombie : NSObject {
    BOOL _resurrectable;
    ccTime _resurrectionCountdown;
    CCTimer* _resurrectionTimer; // own
    float _rebirthPenalityPercent;
}
@property (readwrite, nonatomic, assign) BOOL resurrectable;
@property (readwrite, nonatomic, assign) ccTime resurrectionCountdown;
@property (readwrite, nonatomic, retain) CCTimer* resurrectionTimer; // own
@property (readwrite, nonatomic, assign) float rebirthPenalityPercent;
- (void) startResurrectionTimer;
- (void) stopResurrectionTimer;
@end
// Zombie.m
#import Zombie.h
@implementation Zombie
@synthesize resurrectable = _resurrectable;
@synthesize resurrectionCountdown = _resurrectionCountdown;
@synthesize resurrectionTimer = _resurrectionTimer;
@synthesize rebirthPenalityPercent = _rebirthPenalityPercent;
+ (id) getInstance {
    CCLOG(@"%@: %@", NSStringFromSelector(_cmd), self);
    return [[[self alloc] init] autorelease];
}

- (id) init: {
    CCLOG(@"** %@: %@", NSStringFromSelector(_cmd), self);
    if ((self = [super init])) {
        self.resurrectable = YES;
        self.resurrectionCountdown = 30.0f; // half a second
        self.resurrectionTimer = nil;
        self.rebirthPenalityPercent = 0.10f; // 10% less health
    }
}
@end

Second, I define a call back method to stop the timer:

// later on in Zombie.m
- (void) stopResurrectionTimer {
    CCLOG(@"%@: %@", NSStringFromSelector(_cmd), self);
    if (self.resurrectionTimer != nil) {
    // the only way stop a timer is to deallocate it
        [_resurrectionTimer release];
        _resurrectionTimer = nil;
    }
    // do stuff when the zombie dies...
}

Third, I define a method to start the timer:

- (void) startResurrectionTimer {
    CCLOG(@"%@: %@", NSStringFromSelector(_cmd), self);
    if (self.resurrectionTimer != nil) {
         // if there is an old resurrectionTimer then deallocate it
         // (this is the only way to stop a timer)
        [_resurrectionTimer release];
        _resurrectionTimer = nil;
    }
    //  allocate a new timer with a built-in factory method
    // the stopResurrectionTimer method is called when
    // the time is up!
    self.resurrectionTimer = [CCTimer timerWithTarget:self 
                                             selector:@selector(stopResurrectionTimer)
                                             interval:self.resurrectionCountdown];
}

Fourth, I add a call to update the timer in my CCLayer’s update method:

// ZombieGameLayer.m
- (void) update:(ccTime)delta {
    [self.zombie.ressurrectionTimer update:delta];
}

Finally, Somewhere deep in my game logic I start the timer at the right dramatic moment.

// somewhere else in Zombie.m
- (void) die {
    // call when killed
     CCLOG(@"%@: %@", NSStringFromSelector(_cmd), self);

    // if resurrectable start resurrectionTimer
    if (self.resurrectable) {
        [self startResurrectionTimer];
    }
}

It’s important to note that at the time of this blogging, the CCTimer documentation claims the interval value used to determine the length is in seconds, but really it’s in milliseconds (that is 1/60 of a second). If want your timer’s call back to run in 2 minutes set the CCTimer interval to 160.0f.

It’s also important to note that CCTimer is independent of frame rate: This might be obvious but sometime you want to execute an action every frame an sometime you want to execute it every few milliseconds.

If things aren’t working make sure you’ve told your layer to schedule updates in it’s init method and make sure you are updating your timers from your layer 🙂

Categories
Cocos2d-iPhone Programming

Cocos2d Tip #1: Changing a Sprite’s Image Simply

I’m writing an iPhone game using the Cocos2d-iPhone framework. It’s been smooth sailing except for one little detail: I want a sprite to change it’s image based on a touch.

I think the problem is that there are a dozen ways to do this in Cocos2d. I wanted to find the simplest way to do it. A quick Google search pointed me in the direction of CCAnimationCache and CCTextureCache.

CCAnimationCache is used for running multi-frame animations inside a single sprite. I only have 2 frames for my sprite! CCAnimationCache could do it but it’s a more power than I need to respond to a touch. (If you want to give animation a try check out Ray Wenderlich’s wonderful tutorial.)

CCTextureCache would have been the way to go if I hadn’t already used CCSpriteFrameCache to load all my sprite images at the start of my game. CCSpriteFrameCache uses a plist that divides up a large image into rectangle so you can pack all your sprite images into one memory saving “texture atlas.” And you can use Zwoptex to generate the image and the plist for you. CCTextureCache is the manual way to do what CCSpriteFrameCache and Zwoptex automates for you. (If you like to be hard core check out Ben’s post on optimizing texture loading.)

I figured there had to be a way to use my sprite frames in my existing cache without having to resort to manually loading textures or creating animations I didn’t need.

There was! It’s simple and here’s how to do it…

First, create your texture atlas with Zwoptex and add the .plist and .png files to your Resources folder in your Xcode project.

Second, load the texture atlas into the shared frame cache early in your game…

CCSpriteFrameCache* frameCache = [CCSpriteFrameCache sharedSpriteFrameCache];
[frameCache addSpriteFramesWithFile:@"textureAtlas.png"];

Third, create your sprite in your layer’s – init method…

// Note: niceSprite is a CSprint* instance variable so we can reuse it
niceSprite = [CCSprite spriteWithSpriteFrameName:@"initial_image.png"];
niceSprite.position = CGPointMake(240, 160);
[self addChild:niceSprite z:0 tag:0];

Fourth, in your – ccTouchBegan or – ccTouchesBegan method add the following code to change the image associated with your sprite…

CCSpriteFrameCache* frameCache = [CCSpriteFrameCache sharedSpriteFrameCache];
CCSpriteFrame* frame = [frameCache spriteFrameByName:@"new_image.png"];
[niceSprite setDisplayFrame:frame];

That was easy!