Categories
Comic Books iOS App Software Design

Book Binder App Update: Variant Chaos!

I’m still working on that comic book collecting app! It’s starting to look and feel like a real app but still has a long journey of test driven development ahead of it!

Here’s what it looks like so far…

On the left is the Summary View and on the right is the Detail View. The summary view displays all the series and all the issues in each series that you are tracking. The detail view displays a particular issue, selected from the summary view. As I’ve complained, comic book publishers have little or no organizing skills and important identifying metadata is driven by marketing and whims. My app has to shoehorn a seriously fuzzy world of comic book print editions into data structures that can be sorted. This requires hard choices about how to organize comic book data so the user gets a usable app.

One of the biggest puzzles is what to do with variant covers!

Purchase a recent issue of any popular comic book, especially from Marvel, and you’re just as likely to get a variant cover edition as not. Marvel, as far a I can tell, doesn’t identify variant additions with a signifier. This is probably great marketing. There is some unknown number of variant covers for Fantastic Four #1 (volume 6, started this year 2018). I’ve counted 28 so far!

Hunting variants is like hunting Pokemon! You never know what is lurking in the next comic book shop. Some variant covers are created by famous artists, others feature famous moments or particular characters, some are specific to a comic book shop, and others are created for the dramatic effect of displaying all the covers side-by-side.

Faced with no official designation and a need to figure out what you may or may not own, comic book collectors and sellers have developed their own, local, ways of identifying variants, usually a single letter or string of letters, but also potentially any printable character.

After considering all this madness here is what my super sophisticated user experience for recording variant identifiers looks like…

There’s not much I can do to help the user other than provide some examples in the prompt and make sure she doesn’t add the same variant twice. I’ll probably find a way to list the current tracked variants, if any, and a way to add cover photo as well. But for now the simple text field does the job!

I think this is why general purpose productivity tools, that give people the work of organizing information in to a structure, usually seem easier to use than specialized apps like Book Binder. A simple spreads sheet could be built in minutes the job that my app is taking months to figure out.

I can’t easily use a spread sheet with my iPhone. I tried the iOS versions of Excel and Numbers and they are great for viewing but not so great for data entry or creation. Spread sheet are famous for being so open that errors in data and formulas are hard to detect. Squishy data like variant edition covers is easy to put in a spreadsheet but hard to test, hard to verify, and hard to maintain.

My long term hope is to use Apple’s MLCore Vision framework to identify variant editions on the user’s behalf. But that will only work if I work with a comic shop or collector who can tag all known variant editions and provide me with that data–or just make it available for free on a nicely scalable web server.

As always you can find the Book Binder Code on GitHub: https://github.com/jpavley/Book-Binder

Categories
Nerd Fun Product Design Tech Trends The Future Uncategorized

Is It 1998 Again?

Set the Dial to 1998

Let’s power up the time machine and take a quick trip back to the wide world of tech around 1998. Microsoft was the Khaleesi of software and controlled a vast empire through Windows, Office, and Internet Explorer. Microsoft marched its conquering army of apps over the desktop and through the Internet with innovations like XMLHttpRequest, USB peripherals, and intelligent assistants.

All three of these innovations would go on to fashion the world we live in today with websites that look and feel like apps, devices that plug and play with our computers and phones, and helpful voices that do our bidding.

But back in 1998 these groundbreaking technologies were siloed, incompatible, and unintuitive!

  • You’d find that fancy web apps were usually tied to a specific browser (Walled Garden).
  • You’d buy a USB mouse and often find that it couldn’t wiggle your pointer around the screen (Standard Conformance).
  • You’d grow frustrated with Clippy (aka Clippit the Office assistant) because the only job it could reliably do was “Don’t show me this tip again.” (Poor UX).

And this is exactly where we are in 2018! Still siloed, incompatible, and unintuitive!

  • Do you want to run that cool app? You have to make sure you subscribe to the wall garden where it lives!
  • Do you want your toaster to talk to your doorbell? Hopefully they both conform to the same standard in the same way!
  • Do you want a super intelligent assistant who anticipates your every need, and understands the spirit, if not the meaning, of your commands? Well, you have to know exactly what to say and how to say it.

Digital Mass Extinction

The difference between 1998 and 2018 is that the stakes are higher and the world is more deeply connected. Products and platforms like Apple’s iOS, Google’s Cloud IoT Core, and Amazon’s Alexa existed in 1998–they just couldn’t do as much and they cost a lot more to build and operate.

In between 1998 and 2018 we had a digital mass extinction event—The dot com bubble burst. I was personally involved with two companies that didn’t survive the bubble, FlashPoint (digital camera operating system) and BitLocker (online database application kit). Don’t even try to find these startups in Wikipedia. But there are a few remains of each on the Internet: here and here.

Today, FlashPoint would be reincarnated as a camera-based IoT platform and BitLocker would sit somewhere between iCloud and MongoDB. Yet the core problems of silos, incompatibility, and lack of intuitive control remain. If our modern day apps, IoT, and assistants don’t tackle these problems head-on there will be another mass extinction event. This time in the cloud.

How To Avoid Busting Bubbles

Let’s take a look at the post-dot com bubble burst world for some clues on how to prevent the next extinction. After the startups of the late 1990s died-off in the catastrophe of the early 2000s the designers, developers, and entrepreneurs moved away from silos, proprietary standards, and complicated user experiences. The modern open standards, open source, and simplicity movements picked up steam. It became mission critical that your cool app could run inside any web browser, that it was built on battle tested open source, and that no user manuals were required.

Users found they could buy any computer, use any web browser, and transfer skills between hardware, software, and services. This dedication to openness and interoperability gave great results for the top and bottom lines. Tech companies competed on a level playing field and focused on who could be the most reliable and provide the highest performance and quality. Google and Netflix were born. Apple and Amazon blossomed.

Contrast that with the pre-bubble burst world of 1998 (and 2018) where tech companies competed on being first to market and building high walls around their proprietary gardens.

If we want to avoid the next tech bubble burst (around 2020?) we need Apple, Google, Amazon, and even Netflix to embrace openness and compatibility.

  • Users should be able to talk to Google, Siri, and Alexa in exactly the same way and get similar results (UX transferability).
  • Users should be able to use iOS apps on their Android phones (App compatibility).
  • Users should be able to share connected and virtual worlds such that smart speakers, smart thermostats, and augmented reality work together without tears (Universal IoT bus).

Google and Apple and Standards

At Google I/O last week the Alphabet subsidiary announced a few of examples of bubble avoidance features…

  • Flutter and Material Design improvements that that work as well on Android as they do on iOS.
  • AR “cloud anchors” that create shared virtual spaces between Android and iOS devices.

But sadly Google mostly announced improvements to its silos and proprietary IP.  I’m sure at the WWDC next month Apple announce the same sorts of incremental upgrade that only iPhone and Mac users will benefit from.

Common wisdom is that Apple’s success is build on its proprietary technology from custom chips to custom software. This is simply not true. When I was at Apple in the 1990s success (and failure) built on a foundation of standards, like CD-ROM, USB, and Unicode. Where Apple failed, in the long run, was where it went its own incompatible, inoperable, way.

In the 1998 the macOS was a walled garden failure. In 2018 macOS is a open source BSD Unix-based success. More than Windows, more than ChromeOS, and almost as much as Linux, macOS is an open, extensible, plug and play operating system compatible with most software.

The Ferris Wheel of Replatforming

Ask any tech pundit if the current tech bubble is going to burst and they will reply in all caps: “YES! ANY MOMENT NOW!!! IT’S GONNA BLOW!!!”

Maybe… or rather eventually. Every up has its down. It’s one of the laws of thermodynamics. I remember reading an magazine article in 2000 which argued that the dot com boom would never bust, that we had, through web technology, reached escape velocity. By mid-2000 we were wondering if the tech good times would ever return.

Of course the good times returned. I’m not worried about the FAANG companies surviving these bubbles. Boom and bust is how capitalism works. Creative destruction as been around as long as Shiva, Noah, and Adam Smith. However, it can be tiresome.

I want us to get off the ferris wheel of tech bubbles inflating and deflating. I want, and need, progress. I want my apps to be written once and run everywhere. I want my smart speaker of choice, Siri, to be as smart as Google and have access to all the skills that Alexa enjoys. I want to move my algorithms and data from cloud to cloud the same way I can rent any car and drive it across any road. Mostly, I don’t want to have to go back and “replatform.”

When you take an app, say a banking app or a blog, and rewrite it to work on a new or different platform we call that replatforming. It can be fun if the new platform is modern with cool bells and whistles. But we’ve been replaforming for decades now. I bet Microsoft Word has been replatformed a dozen times now. Or maybe not. Maybe Microsoft is smart, or experienced, enough to realize that just beyond the next bubble is Google’s new mobile operating system Fuchsia and Apple’s iOS 12, 13, and 14 ad infinitum…

The secret to avoid replatforming is to build on top of open standards and open source. To use adaptors and interpreters to integrate into the next Big Future Gamble (BFG). macOS is built this way. It can run on RISC or CISC processors and store data on spinning disk or solid state drives. It doesn’t care and it doesn’t know where the data is going or what type of processor is doing the processing. macOS is continuously adapted but is seldom replatformed.

To make progress, to truly move from stone, to iron, to whatever comes after silicon, we need to stop reinventing the same wheels and instead, use what we have built as building blocks upon which to solve new, richer problems, to progress.

 

Categories
Cocos2d-iPhone Product Design

Dungeonators Battle UI Redesign


There is nothing quite like real user feedback. The Dungeonators game that I started coding about a year ago has been through several design iterations. Before I wrote a line of code I mocked up the whole UI and tested that on my friends and kids (paper prototype, an honorable UI design tradition). And with each development build I tested everything again and even enlisted strangers. I must have played though the final release candidate a 100 times. (It was then that I realized that game programmers must get sick of their games if they properly test them!)

When I uploaded Dungeonators to the App Store on 14 October 2011 I was pretty confident about the game play and the user interface. Famous last words as they say 🙂

After an initial healthily growth curve Dungeonators installs tanked:


The message I get from this user adoption curve was simple: Dunegonators stinks!

So I went back to the drawing board to search for the stinky bits. After much reflection I realized three things:

  1. Dungeonators is too hard for casual users and too easy/dumb for hardcore gamers. People who play MMORPGs like World of Warcraft punch through my game. People who play Angry Birds get stuck around level 1.6. (Which is as far as you can go if you don’t know what you’re doing.)
  2. People don’t know what to touch. They want to touch the avatars and not the raid and spell frames. If you don’t know what raid frames and spell frames are then you are not going to get my game.
  3. I was going to have to fix this. I could fix this problem with a lengthy tutorial or FAQs. But Dungeonators is causal game not productivity software. I never read manuals and skip tutorials. I expect my audience to have the same level of self respect!
So here is the new battle UI that tries to clean this mess up:
  • The good guy raid frames (on the left) are no longer touchable: They just display status. I couldn’t find a casual user who knew what a raid frame was so I got rid of raid frames.
  • Good guy spell frames are no longer associated with good guy raid frames: Spell frames are now modeless and never hidden. Each good guy has two spells available 24/7. As the game progress the spell are automatically upgraded. I’ll have to rewrite the game mechanics to handle the fact that the total number of available spells has gone from 4 x 6 (which I understand is 24) to a mere 8. But that actually makes Dungeonators a heck of lot simpler to program and to play.
  • The bad guy raid frames are still touchable and still enable the player to switch targets. But in the original UI you could have separate bad guy targets for every good guy. In the revised UI all the Dungeonators are synchronized. It’s a gross simplification that is all for the best.
  • Touching the center of the screen, where the avatars live, is still not part of the game play but if you do, the game will pause and bring up the main menu. I was able to kill two birds with one stone: No main menu button and a valid response to a user touch. Feedback is everything thing: In the original design touching the center of the screen was ignored and could have been interpreted as the game freezing up.
In general I learned what I thought I always knew: iPhone games have to be simple and causal gamers don’t have the time or energy for complex mechanics. But in practice I learned a lesson that every battled hardened game developer must know after their first game is released: There is no better test case than the real world!
Categories
Programming

Mac OS 3 UX Simulator Updated!

A modal About the Finder dialog box appears! Click here to see if you can figure out how to make it appear.

Categories
Programming Tech Trends

Mac OS 3: User Center Design Exemplar

I nearly lost all my data a couple of weeks ago. Actually, I was in no danger at all of losing my data but the terribad UI of Apple’s Time Machine and Time Capsule made me think I did! Apple’s backup solution is like a good looking school yard bully with a hidden inferiority complex.

I used to back up everything manually and it was messy. To be fair Apple seemed to conserve all that backup mess with the Time Capsule wireless base station/terabyte network drive and its slick Time Machine backup application. It just seemed to work: No settings, no maintenance, no hunting for the disk with the 3rd season of Buffy on it.

On the rare occasion when I did need a missing or deleted file Time Machine made it easy, and entertaining, to find (nothing like zooming back in time to give lulz).

One evening last week my MacBook Pro died and upon restart got stuck at the kernel panic screen. I took it Tek Serve in NYC (where they are a million time smarter than Apple’s Genius Bar) and learned that a fresh re-install of Mac OS X was the solution.

To make a long story short, when I connected my revived MacBook Pro to Time Capsule it restored a backup from 4 months ago! That’s a generation in Internet years! Also it took over 12 hours! I was aghast!

With grim determination I started the whole process over and tried to get support from Apple. But nothing helped until I just gave up and accessed Time Machine to confirm it was operational. And lo and behold: There was my data from the previous week. Right up to 30 minutes before the kernel panic attack!

%*@:-(

Just before I joined Apple I got some coaching from Bruce Tognizzni (I was designing a set of never-to-be-released apps for Letraset back in 1991). Tog explained that good user centered design doesn’t just hide complexity–it enables the user to navigate it. Time Machine and Time Capsule are bad user centered design according to this definition since they are pretty faces and not much more.

I can’t think of any better example of user centered design than the original Mac OS (version 3) and apps like MacPaint and MacWrite. And since you can’t run it anymore (but you can see screen shots at the Vintage Mac Museum) I decided to bring the Mac OS 3 back to life in flash. Embedded above is version 0.1 of the Mac OS 3 Flash Sim. It don’t do much but I promise to whittle away at it as time permits. I’ll post the source code shortly as well. Right now you can selected the trash can and pull down the apple menu.

It’s funny but the constrained yet expressive capabilities of the original Mac OS are much more like the user experience of the iPhone and iPod Touch then the current Mac OS X. There is something to be said for the power of limitations.